November 2014, Green Plow Juicery, Nobel Prize, Bacon Apple Cobbler

Juice You Will Never Forget


Next time you are craving something delicious and healthy in Eugene, you are sure to be satisfied at the Green Plow Juicery. Owned by Jason and Amy Green, along with Shaun and Carolina Plowman, the four bring their extensive experience together to make, well, some insanely good drinks. The one year old business operates out of a large food card located right across from the Friendly Street Market. I was curious about the business and managed to get a chance to talk with Amy Green. It was while traveling across the United States with their son some seven yeras ago that the Greens had the idea to open an organic juice bar. The idea came up again last Janueary and they decided to go for it. "Food was a major reason we moved here" says Green, referring to the fertile Willamette Valley, "Everything we carry is organic." Both families practice eating organic in their personal lives, and one of their goals is providing something for the community that is nourishing and healthy. I can definitely say that the innovative selections on their menu taste as good as they will make you feel. I recently enjoyed a pleasantly spicy Pele's Fire, a fruit smoothie with a dash of cayenne and ginger, and I am excited to try their Carrot Coconut Chai nect time around. The menu is robust- too many good things to list here, and my mouth waters just looking at it. You can see for yourself, there's a link to it on their Facebook page facebook.com/TheGreenPlowJuicery. Or you can stop by the juice bar Monday through Friday from 8am-6pm, and Saturday 10am-6pm, you'll be glad you did! -Keith Fox

Bacon Apple Cobbler

This is a very fall appropriate treat, that tastes way less healthy than it is! Fresh and hot, with whipped cream, it makes a lovely desert. I've also been eating the leftovers with yogurt in the morning, as it's also very granola like, in the best way.



    Ingredients:
    • 1 stick Butter
    • 4 cups Oats
    • Large spoon
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
    • 1 Sweet potato
    • 2 large apples
    • 6 small apples
    • 3 Eggs
    • 8 strips of bacon
    • 2 cups brown sugar


    • 1) Preheat oven to 400 degrees
    • 2) Put stick of butter in pan in the oven, while it heats. This will melt the butter and grease the pan all in one!
    • 3) Mix oats, sugar, salt, and cinnamon in mixing bowl
    • 4) Chop small apples in pieces no larger than a half inch.
    • 5) Start bacon frying.
    • 7) Put just over half of oat mixture in the pan, and use fingers or a spoon to spread and compact it.
    • 8) Create a second layer with the chopped apples.
    • 9) Chop the bacon as fine as possible (once it's cool enough to touch) and sprinkle over apples.
    • 10) Pour remaining oat mix over this, and use a spoon to even it out.
    • 11) Thinly slice large apples and lay out on top.
    • 12) Bake for 25 minutes.

A Shining Invention: Three Scientists Receive the Nobel Prize in Physics

This year's Nobel Prize in physics was awarded for an invention that will greatly benefit mankind. That is, “for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources." The Prize was awarded to the three men who invented the diodes together:i


Isamu Akasaki - Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan and Nagoya University, Japan.

Hiroshi Amano - Nagoya University, Japan.

Shuji Nakamura - University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Surely over the past several years we all have noticed newer and increasingly more efficient light bulbs on store shelves everywhere, but this new technology tops all of them. White light is made up of red, green, and blue light. Red and green diodes have been around for years, but these new blue diodes complete the puzzle for an extremely energy efficient white light. Right now about a fourth of electricity comsumption in most industrialized economies goes to illumination, but that is soon to change all over the world thanks to these Nobel lauriates and their years of hard work. Much more light for much less electricity is what we're looking at here, good news for just about everyone. This also means illumination in places where electricity is so scarce that electric lamps have not been possible until now. Good going guys. -Keith Fox